Category: abandoned Ontario

Drowning in Glass – 2019

A former mixed use building containing retail stores and a restaurant on the ground floor and offices on the upper floors in the heart of Downtown Toronto.

Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Rabbit Graphs – 2019

former mixed use building containing retail stores and a restaurant on the ground floor and offices on the upper floors in the heart of Downtown Toronto.

I am by no means a fan of the “green” movement that’s currently popular, there are many reasons for this but I am not going to get into this here. The topic that I will touch on is what the “green” movement doesn’t take into consideration. One of those things is the waste created by demolishing older buildings and replacing them with new ones. This photo is a great example of this since it shows the amount of waste that is created when you demolish a building. This is all just insulation and drywall from the interior demolition of just a couple of rooms. This large building was about 12 stories and using this photo as an example, you can imagine how much waste is created by demolishing one of these older buildings.

Another interesting fact to note is that the creation of concrete accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 output and concrete is one of, if not the most popular building material used today.

Office Building, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Discarded – 2019

A former mixed use building containing retail stores and a restaurant on the ground floor and offices on the upper floors in the heart of Downtown Toronto.

We have many buildings in Canada that are heritage designated for various reasons, but unfortunately for a lot of companies looking to develop these sites with higher density in mind, they tend to see these designations as a hindrance rather than an opportunity.  Rightfully so, these companies are businesses after all and they need to make money, otherwise there would be no reason to redevelop a site in the first place.  The problem is Heritage designation in Canada does not mean a whole lot.  At best it protects the exterior of the building and at worst it only protects the facade which is only one exterior wall.  We need to find a way to better protect the historical buildings in this country, otherwise one day we will wake up to find that particular part of history has been erased almost completely.

Office Building, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Protected – 2019

The lines in this photo are all off, I don’t think anything was lined up properly in this living room.

House, Ontario, Canada.

Dialing it Down – 2018

Shown here is a partial view of one of the four control rooms within this massive former generating station.  All the analogue dials and the traditional hospital green, which is typical of these types of locations from the era, is a welcome sight and a reminder of the past and the progress that has since taken place.

Coal Fired Generating Station, Ontario, Canada.

Structural Integrity – 2018

Coal Fired Generating Station, Ontario, Canada.

Unit 5 – 2018

The size of this Generating Station was absolutely massive, it housed eight generating units and this was part of what was left of one of those units.  This is a location that will stay fresh in my memories for years to come, my only regret is having not spent more time there.

Generating Station, Ontario, Canada.

The Only Way Out is Through – 2018

One of the many rooms inside a former hotel in downtown Toronto.

I visited this hotel shortly after it closed and it was filthy, because of the short time between its closing and my visit, I suspect it looked much the same as when it was still in operation.  The hotel is now demolished along with its rather interesting architecture and history that you see so little of in this rapidly developing city.

Waverly Hotel, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Curtain Call – 2018

The gymnasium inside the now demolished, Davisville Junior Public School, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Daycare Reflections – 2018

An exterior photo showing the west side of the now demolished Davisville Junior Public School.  You can see the staircase a photographed in my previous post through the windows on the right side of this image.

Toronto, Ontario, Canada.