Category: Architecture

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

So, the new federal carbon tax was implemented today, I was hoping it was going to be an April Fool’s joke but apparently not.  Right now it seems to have raised gas prices by about 5 cents per litre in Ontario and we can expect that expense to more than double in a few years over the life of its implementation.  We will see how the tax affects the costs to heat our homes and how over the long term it also increases the already rapidly rising costs of everyday goods such as groceries and clothing.  One thing is for sure, everyone is definitely going to less spending power with these new taxes, the coming October federal election cannot come soon enough.

So apparently the manufacturing of cement accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 emissions, 900 kg of CO2 are emitted for the fabrication of every ton of cement, yet this a topic that never seems to come up when talking about climate change.  There is also the issue of concrete demolition which releases harmful dusts into the air, not to mention that some concrete was also created with asbestos embedded into the mixture.  Everyone is so environmentally conscious but when it comes to ripping down buildings they don’t even think twice.

So my question is, why does this 11 storey office tower need to torn down in the first place, could it not be repurposed into the new development?

As I was setting up my camera to take this photo a guy walked passed me, he didn’t see me so I watched him to see what he was doing.  He went inside the shell of the building and a few minutes later I could hear the sound of a grinder, he was one of the many copper thieves I have encountered while visiting these places.  He was not at all aware of my presence even when standing only feet away from him, he was working just behind the pile of rubble that I was standing on while taking this photo.

Standing in front of an 11 storey office tower being torn down in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

So, the new federal carbon tax was implemented today, I was hoping it was going to be an April Fool’s joke but apparently not.  Right now it seems to have raised gas prices by about 5 cents per litre in Ontario and we can expect that expense to more than double in a few years over the life of its implementation.  We will see how the tax affects the costs to heat our homes and how over the long term it also increases the already rapidly rising costs of everyday goods such as groceries and clothing.  One thing is for sure, everyone is definitely going to less spending power with these new taxes, the coming October federal election cannot come soon enough.

So apparently the manufacturing of cement accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 emissions, 900 kg of CO2 are emitted for the fabrication of every ton of cement, yet this a topic that never seems to come up when talking about climate change.  There is also the issue of concrete demolition which releases harmful dusts into the air, not to mention that some concrete was also created with asbestos embedded into the mixture.  Everyone is so environmentally conscious but when it comes to ripping down buildings they don’t even think twice.

So my question is, why does this 11 storey office tower need to torn down in the first place, could it not be repurposed into the new development?

As I was setting up my camera to take this photo a guy walked passed me, he didn’t see me so I watched him to see what he was doing.  He went inside the shell of the building and a few minutes later I could hear the sound of a grinder, he was one of the many copper thieves I have encountered while visiting these places.  He was not at all aware of my presence even when standing only feet away from him, he was working just behind the pile of rubble that I was standing on while taking this photo.

Standing in front of an 11 storey office tower being torn down in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Get to the Gone – 2019

Get to the Gone – 2019

Again, I am included in this image for scale, from the Toronto parking garage undergoing demolition in Yorkville, Toronto, Ontario.

Get to the Gone – 2019

Get to the Gone – 2019

Again, I am included in this image for scale, from the Toronto parking garage undergoing demolition in Yorkville, Toronto, Ontario.

I really enjoyed exploring and photographing t…

I really enjoyed exploring and photographing this parking garage that was undergoing demolition, it was extremely cold, windy and snowy both days I had visited but just made the experience that much more memorable.

This 7 floor parking garage located in the posh Yorkville neighbourhood was able to hold more than 1000 vehicles while it was in operation.  It will be replaced by two new condominium towers that are 42 and 66 stories in height.  My question is where are all the people who used to use this parking lot going to park now.

I really enjoyed exploring and photographing t…

I really enjoyed exploring and photographing this parking garage that was undergoing demolition, it was extremely cold, windy and snowy both days I had visited but just made the experience that much more memorable.

This 7 floor parking garage located in the posh Yorkville neighbourhood was able to hold more than 1000 vehicles while it was in operation.  It will be replaced by two new condominium towers that are 42 and 66 stories in height.  My question is where are all the people who used to use this parking lot going to park now.

Small World – 2019

Small World – 2019

People always ask me why I like to photograph “abandoned” buildings and I use this term loosely, since there are very few buildings anywhere in the world that are truly abandoned.  The reason I enjoy photographing these places is for two main reasons.  The first is that photography has become so common in society that almost everything is photographed to death, for example search for any popular tourist attraction and I am sure you could find millions of photographs and to be honest, that bores me.  These buildings are temporary and constantly changing, so it is unlikely that anyone else will be taking the same photo.  The other reason is that the inside of buildings are private property and the owners are usually not interested in allowing people to take pictures of them.  I find that nine times out of ten when I try to photograph an active building, I am asked to stop, whereas when I am photographing “abandoned” buildings, it is actually quite rare that I even see another person during that time.

Taken on an extremely cold and snowy night at a Toronto parking garage undergoing demolition in Yorkville, Toronto, Ontario.

Small World – 2019

Small World – 2019

People always ask me why I like to photograph “abandoned” buildings and I use this term loosely, since there are very few buildings anywhere in the world that are truly abandoned.  The reason I enjoy photographing these places is for two main reasons.  The first is that photography has become so common in society that almost everything is photographed to death, for example search for any popular tourist attraction and I am sure you could find millions of photographs and to be honest, that bores me.  These buildings are temporary and constantly changing, so it is unlikely that anyone else will be taking the same photo.  The other reason is that the inside of buildings are private property and the owners are usually not interested in allowing people to take pictures of them.  I find that nine times out of ten when I try to photograph an active building, I am asked to stop, whereas when I am photographing “abandoned” buildings, it is actually quite rare that I even see another person during that time.

Taken on an extremely cold and snowy night at a Toronto parking garage undergoing demolition in Yorkville, Toronto, Ontario.

Next Generation – 2018

Next Generation – 2018

Once the largest coal fired generating station in North America housing 8 generating units, it could produce up 4000 MW at max capacity, which would be enough to power approximately 4,000,000 homes.

This is the turbine hall inside this facility where the generating units were housed.

Ontario, Canada.

Next Generation – 2018

Next Generation – 2018

Once the largest coal fired generating station in North America housing 8 generating units, it could produce up 4000 MW at max capacity, which would be enough to power approximately 4,000,000 homes.

This is the turbine hall inside this facility where the generating units were housed.

Ontario, Canada.