Category: Canada

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

So, the new federal carbon tax was implemented today, I was hoping it was going to be an April Fool’s joke but apparently not.  Right now it seems to have raised gas prices by about 5 cents per litre in Ontario and we can expect that expense to more than double in a few years over the life of its implementation.  We will see how the tax affects the costs to heat our homes and how over the long term it also increases the already rapidly rising costs of everyday goods such as groceries and clothing.  One thing is for sure, everyone is definitely going to less spending power with these new taxes, the coming October federal election cannot come soon enough.

So apparently the manufacturing of cement accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 emissions, 900 kg of CO2 are emitted for the fabrication of every ton of cement, yet this a topic that never seems to come up when talking about climate change.  There is also the issue of concrete demolition which releases harmful dusts into the air, not to mention that some concrete was also created with asbestos embedded into the mixture.  Everyone is so environmentally conscious but when it comes to ripping down buildings they don’t even think twice.

So my question is, why does this 11 storey office tower need to torn down in the first place, could it not be repurposed into the new development?

As I was setting up my camera to take this photo a guy walked passed me, he didn’t see me so I watched him to see what he was doing.  He went inside the shell of the building and a few minutes later I could hear the sound of a grinder, he was one of the many copper thieves I have encountered while visiting these places.  He was not at all aware of my presence even when standing only feet away from him, he was working just behind the pile of rubble that I was standing on while taking this photo.

Standing in front of an 11 storey office tower being torn down in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

Yellow Concrete Eater – 2019

So, the new federal carbon tax was implemented today, I was hoping it was going to be an April Fool’s joke but apparently not.  Right now it seems to have raised gas prices by about 5 cents per litre in Ontario and we can expect that expense to more than double in a few years over the life of its implementation.  We will see how the tax affects the costs to heat our homes and how over the long term it also increases the already rapidly rising costs of everyday goods such as groceries and clothing.  One thing is for sure, everyone is definitely going to less spending power with these new taxes, the coming October federal election cannot come soon enough.

So apparently the manufacturing of cement accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 emissions, 900 kg of CO2 are emitted for the fabrication of every ton of cement, yet this a topic that never seems to come up when talking about climate change.  There is also the issue of concrete demolition which releases harmful dusts into the air, not to mention that some concrete was also created with asbestos embedded into the mixture.  Everyone is so environmentally conscious but when it comes to ripping down buildings they don’t even think twice.

So my question is, why does this 11 storey office tower need to torn down in the first place, could it not be repurposed into the new development?

As I was setting up my camera to take this photo a guy walked passed me, he didn’t see me so I watched him to see what he was doing.  He went inside the shell of the building and a few minutes later I could hear the sound of a grinder, he was one of the many copper thieves I have encountered while visiting these places.  He was not at all aware of my presence even when standing only feet away from him, he was working just behind the pile of rubble that I was standing on while taking this photo.

Standing in front of an 11 storey office tower being torn down in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Always Fresh – 2018

Always Fresh – 2018

While new condominium towers are commonplace in the City of Toronto a closed Tim Hortons is pretty unique.  A pretty rare find, this Tim Hortons closed down when a North York plaza/office was bought by a development company.  The fast food restaurant was moved into another unit of the building while this section would be demolished.  This photo was taken just before dark, my friend had mentioned there was an abandoned Tim Hortons somewhere in the plaza but I had trouble finding it initially.  There was some light coming in through the windows which acted as my fill light for the main light source which was a flashlight I had brought with me.

Tim Hortons Restaurant, North York, Ontario.

Always Fresh – 2018

Always Fresh – 2018

While new condominium towers are commonplace in the City of Toronto a closed Tim Hortons is pretty unique.  A pretty rare find, this Tim Hortons closed down when a North York plaza/office was bought by a development company.  The fast food restaurant was moved into another unit of the building while this section would be demolished.  This photo was taken just before dark, my friend had mentioned there was an abandoned Tim Hortons somewhere in the plaza but I had trouble finding it initially.  There was some light coming in through the windows which acted as my fill light for the main light source which was a flashlight I had brought with me.

Tim Hortons Restaurant, North York, Ontario.

Shifting – 2018

Shifting – 2018

With well over a hundred units and multiple buildings, visiting this location was very much like exploring a ghost town.  I went back to this location a few times and the only other people around were a group of kids and some squatters living inside one of the units.  The power was on at this complex and most of the units were open and nothing was boarded, that was until there was a fire at one of the units, likely set by that same group of kids I had seen during a previous visit.  After the fire, the squatters were gone, the windows of the buildings were boarded and security roamed the grounds looking for trespassers.

Former public housing complex that was located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Shifting – 2018

Shifting – 2018

With well over a hundred units and multiple buildings, visiting this location was very much like exploring a ghost town.  I went back to this location a few times and the only other people around were a group of kids and some squatters living inside one of the units.  The power was on at this complex and most of the units were open and nothing was boarded, that was until there was a fire at one of the units, likely set by that same group of kids I had seen during a previous visit.  After the fire, the squatters were gone, the windows of the buildings were boarded and security roamed the grounds looking for trespassers.

Former public housing complex that was located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Days Gone By – 2018

Days Gone By – 2018

Tenants were moved out of this public housing complex slowly over a period of time, most people left and took most if not all of their belongings.  Others weren’t so lucky, there were a few units that looked more like time capsules, as those tenants were unwilling or unable to move out when given their notice.  I was amazed in general at the amount of ‘stuff’ that was left behind but it definitely made for a more entertaining explore this way.  This is an exterior view taken at dusk of a few of the units in this literal ghost town of a complex.

Former public housing complex that was located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Days Gone By – 2018

Days Gone By – 2018

Tenants were moved out of this public housing complex slowly over a period of time, most people left and took most if not all of their belongings.  Others weren’t so lucky, there were a few units that looked more like time capsules, as those tenants were unwilling or unable to move out when given their notice.  I was amazed in general at the amount of ‘stuff’ that was left behind but it definitely made for a more entertaining explore this way.  This is an exterior view taken at dusk of a few of the units in this literal ghost town of a complex.

Former public housing complex that was located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Saint Philip’s Anglican Church – 2015

Saint Philip’s Anglican Church – 2015

St. Philip’s Anglican Church built in 1894 atop the original foundation from 1848, was in operation until 2003 when a new building was built on the same property.  An attempt by the Diocese to obtain a demolition permit was denied by town council and the next day the church’s steeple was sawed off and pulled to the ground.  Shortly after this devastating incident the town designated the church a Municipal Heritage Structure.  Just days later, residents of Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s witnessed a parishioner loading church pews into a truck and trailer. The man was allegedly following instructions from parish officials to cut them into shelving for the new church.

I took this photo of the church and its fallen steeple in June 2015, later that year in September, a demolition permit was issued and the church was demolished shortly after that.

St. Philip’s Anglican Church, Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s, Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada.

Saint Philip’s Anglican Church – 2015

Saint Philip’s Anglican Church – 2015

St. Philip’s Anglican Church built in 1894 atop the original foundation from 1848, was in operation until 2003 when a new building was built on the same property.  An attempt by the Diocese to obtain a demolition permit was denied by town council and the next day the church’s steeple was sawed off and pulled to the ground.  Shortly after this devastating incident the town designated the church a Municipal Heritage Structure.  Just days later, residents of Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s witnessed a parishioner loading church pews into a truck and trailer. The man was allegedly following instructions from parish officials to cut them into shelving for the new church.

I took this photo of the church and its fallen steeple in June 2015, later that year in September, a demolition permit was issued and the church was demolished shortly after that.

St. Philip’s Anglican Church, Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s, Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada.